Why do not my muscles grow?

Views on how to eat properly to effectively build muscle mass is no less than the theory of the most effective ways to lose weight. The multiplicity of various beliefs, the multitude of their interpretations and the commonly prevailing misinformation make many people build their masses from the wrong side, often at the outset often making elementary mistakes and thereby partially slowing down or completely frustrating progression. 

For some of us it seems that to grow it is enough to intensively and regularly exercise and eat several times a day chicken breasts, rice, oatmeal, eggs and skinny dairy products, and drink weight gainers and protein supplements. On the Internet forums you can often meet with entries like I eat a lot of meat and rice, I take nutrients and supplements, and yet I do not grow, what should I do? The reason why these activities quite often do not bring the desired effect in the form of weight gain is too low energy supply. The key meaning here is the quantity, which is often a completely neglected issue. A clear weight gain is possible only when it is possible to obtain an energy surplus in relation to the daily demand related to, among others, with work, study or physical activity. 

As it is commonly known, muscles are made of bricks called amino acids, whose food source are protein-rich products such as meat, dairy products, fish and eggs. It is quite popular, therefore, that the rate of increase in muscle mass is proportional to the intake of proteins. The effect of this way of thinking are diets characterized by disproportionately high protein intake in relation to energy nutrients. Too high protein supply, with too low intake of carbohydrates and fat in the case of many people may hinder mass building. In the absence of an adequate balance, much of the amino acids consumed, instead of getting to the muscle tissue is used as an energy material, which in practice is extremely inefficient. In addition, people who eat too much protein may experience a prolonged feeling of satiety after eating meals, which makes it difficult to cover an increased energy demand. 

Although it may seem that the evil spirit of fatal phobia has been swept up thanks to scientific publications and research results, which clearly showed that elimination of this ingredient from the diet is not good for anything, still in some circles the view is that diet targeting non-fat increase body weight, fat should be almost completely deprived. And so many people, according to this assumption, making scrambled eggs separates yolks for proteins, uses only skimmed milk for post-workout cocktails, and for lunch only eats very lean meats. In fact, such an approach is not only unjustified, but it can even make it difficult to build a mass. Based on only low-fat products, it is difficult to satisfy the increased energy demand, and in extreme cases, I may be deficient in important nutrients such as fat-soluble vitamins or omega-3 fatty acids. 

 

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You can read also: HMB – supporting the building of muscle mass