Training + BCAA = more testosterone

Some still deny the effects of BCAA, but scientific research remains ruthless and still provides us with information regarding the legitimacy of using branched-chain amino acids. Biologists from the Islamic University of Azad in Iran have decided to once again explore the issue of BCAA supplementation in the context of the growth of anabolic hormones. Although the study has been traditionally carried out on mice, it still provides us with a lot of interesting data.

Research

Scientists divided the mice into three groups.

Quick reminder - BCAA is a blend of three amino acids - Valine, Leucine and Isoleucine
Quick reminder – BCAA is a blend of three amino acids – Valine, Leucine and Isoleucine
  • The first of them did running training 5 times a week, 45 minutes each, with an intensity of 70% VO2 max, with the addition of BCAA in an amount of 20 mg, which gives 5-7 g per day based on the weight of an adult.
  • The second group only received BCAA 60 mg.
  • The third group did training without supplementation.

The experiment lasted 8 weeks.

Results

The highest testosterone result was achieved by the group that performed exercises using 20 mg BCAA supplementation. Moderate BCAA doses of 20 mg also caused an increase in growth hormone levels.

Conclusions

Scientists have concluded that moderate doses of branched-chain amino acids improve mitochondrial activity in muscles. There are also human studies that clearly show that the use of BCAA-based supplements effectively optimizes the hormones in our body.