BCAAs inhibit fat gain?

In a study of Japanese scientists, two groups of mice received feed delivering 45% or 60% of energy from fat for 6 weeks. Mice quickly gained weight. After 4 weeks, half of them began to receive BCAA (in 1 ml of the drink 20 mg BCAA). 

Mice that received BCAA and provided 60% of energy from fat did not stop, but in the group providing 45% fat, the rate of fat gain was significantly reduced. These animals (45% of energy from fat) who received BCAA for 2 weeks had up to 50% less white body fat compared to the control group and gained 7% less body weight. 

In addition, they had less white epididymal WAT (epididymal fat). BCAA also reduced triglyceride content in the liver and decreased insulin and triglyceride levels in the blood. 

This is of extreme importance because the amount of triglycerides (e.g., liver or other tissues) is associated with interference with the insulin-stimulated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway or glucose transporter (GLUT4) transport and glucose uptake leading to insulin resistance. 

Will these results translate into people? No one knows this, but as you can see, new mechanisms associated with branched chain amino acids are constantly being discovered. 

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